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          Now I offer a special bonus, the wisdoms of a recognized world expert on the topic of enthusiasm – David Starr Jordan, first President of Stanford University.  Here are excerpts from his 1906 book, Life’s Enthusiasms1 and other books. 
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And my message in its fashion shall be an appeal to enthusiasm in things of life, a call to do things because we love them, to love things because we do them, to keep the eyes open, the heart warm and the pulses swift, as we move across the field of life.  Let “the bit of green sod under your feet be the sweetest to you in this world, in any world.”  ... let us keep our hearts young and our eyes open that nothing worth our while shall escape us.  And everything is worth our while, if we only grasp it and its significance. As we grow older it becomes harder to do this. A grown man sees nothing he was not ready to see in his youth. So long as enthusiasm lasts, so long is youth still with us.  “To take the old world by the hand and frolic with it;” this is Stevenson's recipe for joyousness. Old as the world is, let it be always new to us as we are new to it.  Let it be every morning made afresh by Him who “instantly and constantly reneweth the work of creation.” 
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Regarding teachers: Plodding and prodding is not the teacher’s work. It is inspiration, on-leading, the flashing of enthusiasms. A teacher in any field should be one who has chosen his work because he loves it, who makes no repine because he takes with it the vow of poverty, who finds his reward in the joy of knowing and in the joy of making known.
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The poorest use of time is to kill it. This is the weakest and most cowardly form of suicide. Moreover it is never quite successful.
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Bad poetry is not poetry at all except to the man who makes it. For its creator, even the feeblest verse speaks something of inspiration and of aspiration.
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In the arts of music and painting and sculpture, one may find not only professional satisfaction, but the strength that comes from higher living and more lofty feeling. In the study of history as biography, the acquaintance with the men and women of other times, those who have felt and thought and acted and suffered to make a freer world for you and me, like inspiration may be found. History is more than its incidents. It is the movement of man. The picturesque individual, the man who could not be counted with the mass, give inspiration to history.  He names such individuals as David, Christ, Caesar, Plato, Cromwell, Darwin, Goethe, Franklin, and Lincoln, among others.  It is well that we should know them, should know them all, [and] should know them well....
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... action should be understood in a large way, the taking of one’s part in affairs worth doing, not mere activity, nor fussiness, nor movement for movement’s sake, like that of “ants on whom pepper is sprinkled.” As the lesser enthusiasms fade and fail, one should take a stronger hold on the higher ones. “Grizzling hair the brain doth clear” and one sees in better perspective the things that need doing.
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1Copyright 1906 by the American Unitarian Association: printed by the Heintzmann Press, Boston